Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Some staff wallahs


The War Correspondent

I took delivery of these chaps a few months ago.  I haven't a bean where they came from exactly, they were in a box of waifs and strays that I got from John Cunningham and I thought I'd add a few eccentrics to my gentlemen in red. 

This chap will be doing double duty as a war correspondent and possibly a staff officer as and when he is needed.  In fact in the late 19th century, those roles often overlapped as officers would write letters home for publication, Winston Churchill being one famous example. 

Illustration by Michael Roffe, from Wilkinson Latham's Osprey on the Sudan

I had the idea of a game where players are on the same side, but are competing with each other for victory points.  They have limited control over the war correspondent, but he acts as a victory point multiplier. In essence, he exaggerates what ever is actually occurring on the field.  So if you gain two victory points for defeating the enemy or gaining an objective and the correspondent is there, you will gain a third point.  But if you lose points, due to casualties for example, the correspondent will cost you an extra point for every two you lose.  Consequently, if you think your competitor is going to have a bad time of it, it would be wise to send the correspondent over his way. 

An idea to mull over. 


One of the cavalry gentlemen

The vast majority of my late Victorian army is in red coats because I rather like redcoats and even when they are inaccurate they are what I think of when I think on the period.  I think it's the equivalent of always deploying my Napoleonic armies in parade dress.  But I thought it would  a good idea for the senior officers and staff chaps to stand out a bit.  This fella will be doing duty as a staff officer, perhaps an interpreter, in scenarios to come. 

I should point out that these are not my own work, but come from the ever talented brush of Mr. Tamas Lehoczky of Hungary.  A fellow 1/72 enthusiast, I think his impressionistic, high contrast style works exceedingly well in this scale.  The photos don't quite do it justice, but the highlights do a lot of the work and that look very tasty on the tabletop.  

An image I found on Pinterest, unfortunately I can't put a name to the source. 


*incomprehensible Scottish noises*
(perhaps Mr. Gow would be kind enough to translate?)

This is an old Hinton Hunt sculpt again from the redoubtable John C. In this case, I don't think the camera has been kind to Tamas's excellent brushwork as the red in the tartan stands out rather more than it does on the tabletop. Regardless, I expect McLehoczky of the Fife McLehoczky's to fall upon the enemies of the Crown with all the claymore wielding fury of his alcoholic Australian forebears. 


 
Another image I found on Pinterest
(Tamas was going to add the extra mustache, but ran out of greenstuff)

Pinterest is a mine of stuff, though often badly referenced, but it would be the act of louse to complain about something one has not paid for.  From the pictures I found with this image - it should refer to India in the 1890s.  The main thing is that he looks the part and cuts a dash and that's good enough for me. 



Portrait of the Artist as a young Sloth

In other news, we discovered that young Teddy Kinch was adopted.  It was a surprise to us all, not least his mother, but there you are. The poor little chap had terrible trouble with wind. To be honest we could call him Kamikaze Kinch, though the wind in question is of doubtful divinity. 

Kamikaze Kinch becomes great distressed until placed over one knee and gently, but firmly pounded on the back for a few minutes.  There is then a long drawn out PAAAARP  like a sad trombone, followed by a small sigh, whereupon he goes completely limp for hours at a time.  

It was a strange way to discover that my son was part sloth. 

But we shall love him and raise him as our own. 


30 comments:

  1. Interesting idea regarding war correspondents. In my pile of completely unpainted Mexican Revolution figures is a film crew. I was thinking roughly along the same lines - except for the bit about all players being on the same side - based loosely on the events in the film 'And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself', which actually stars Antonio Banderas.

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  2. Wonderful new additions to your collection. I like the correspondent ideas especially. Windful sloths, eh? I have a cat in my lap at the moment. Just as limp, but purring mightily and, um, less brassy than the young Kinch pictured above.

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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  3. These are absolutely wonderful, what fabulous additions to the collection. As for the last revelation, I am still wiping tears of laughter from my eyes.

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  4. You receive much interesting stuff from your man in Hungary. Lucky you!

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  5. Very nicely done, they look so elegant!

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  6. I think the 17th lancers picture was either from an early Mil Mod or Battle. I'm sure I've got it somewhere.

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    1. Definitely Military Modelling from way back in the '80s. I have it in my uniform scrapbook.

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    2. Well done chaps. Run to earth.

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  7. A fine looking addition to HM's forces.

    It seems there was sometimes a fair bit of competitiveness to be the first to file leading to some occasionally sly and nasty tricks and tactics. If one had sufficient players one might have competing correspondents trying to get to the "wire" with the best combo or "right" and "first". Actually with multiple players I suppose they could each run their own correspondent.

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    1. That's not a bad idea actually. Though it would necessitate making the game just about correspondents.

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  8. All these figures exude dash and pluck, especially the chap w the neon trews. Like your idea about using correspondents as VP multipliers very much.

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  9. That first picture looks like an RSM (ex Pax Britannica) officer

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    1. I think you had the right of it there.

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  10. Can confirm the war Correspondent and Cavalry Gentleman are indeed RSM (ex Pax Britannica) figures, lovely paint job, am envious
    As to young Teddy being slothful, takes after his father there judging by the way his father moves (or not) his troops across table!!!
    WIND, Teddy's performance just like my sheepdog bitch only it sounds like she's whistling "Dixie"
    cheers Old John

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    1. Wouldn't even dignify that accusation with an answer.

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    2. See you can't defend the truth!!!!
      cheers Old John

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    3. But the horse? Looks like maybe Kennington to me?

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    4. Horse is original RSM
      cheers Old John

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  11. Conrad,

    Those are great additions to your collection. I mirror MG's comments as well sir. Your blog is one of my favorites to follow.

    Congrats and good luck with the family. I had 2 very high energy boys in diapers at the same time in the not so distant past and fully understand the lack of free time to devote to one's hobby. Lil Kinch will surprise, amaze, and befuddle you sir. Sometimes all at the same time.

    Good luck with the book. Based on the way you blog I'm confident its of quality.

    Cheers,
    JB

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