Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Airfix French Cuirassier

Photo by Takacs Krisztian 

One of the pleasures of the Sunday game was that I got to meet up with Krisztian (not painting Krisztian, gaming Krisztian)* and he beat me hollow at Memoir '44. I settled his hash at Arnhem, but he hammered me at Samur and in the Courland Pocket. Krisztian brought with him some figures from Hungary which will be appearing here in short order. But first amongst them was an Airfix French Cuirassier. 

Photo by Takacs Krisztian 

This was painted by a friend of Krisztians.  A man he described as "...the talented one." Now, I mostly collect figures for wargaming purposes, but every so often one picks up a toy soldier for the sheer pleasure of looking at a toy soldier. All I can say is what a beauty. I don't know if the chap is looking for commission work, but I will gladly forward the details of any blog reader that is interested. 

Photo by Takacs Krisztian 

The use of colour, the attention to details, the beautiful work on the horse - this dastardly Frencher is sitting on my desk at the moment (I'm meant to be writing an article) and I've just been spellbound. What a piece of work. 

Photo by Takacs Krisztian 

I think the work on the face of the cuirassier and the horses eyes are particularly good. You can almost smell the sweat.  On the few occasions I've had the privilege of working with the mounted unit, the thing that has always struck me is the heat that radiates from a horse on a cold day and the strong musky scent. Having this chap coming at you at full tilt must have been a nerve wracking experience. 


Hold boys! Hold! 
The battle of Quatre Bras by Lady Butler
(of which I am really inordinately fond

Note the dismounted cuirassier in the right foreground. 



Another look at that fantastic horse - I can only presume that the painter was working in oils to get such a wonderful sheen on the horses coat. 




Artist's impression of Kinch

I'd just like to conclude this post by observing that don't talented people make you sick to your stomach? Look at them with their hard won skill, achieved by work, application and God given talent - thinking their better than you.  And knowing that they are right. 

I'm just going to sit here and stew in my own mediocrity. 

Bah humbug. 

But, still and all, what a figure - just wow. I'm still marvelling at him as I write this. 

Note: Should anyone wish to get in touch with the painter, drop me a comment and I'll put you in touch.  He works exclusively in large scale figures. 




*I have a theory that all Hungarians are in fact called Krisztian.  Old John maintains that this is true, though there is one Hungarian called Zolt apparently.  He must have been terribly picked on in school. 

19 comments:

  1. Unbelievably stunning brushwork! What size is the figure? I painted many Airfix HO scale French cuirassiers as a lad and I don't recall them looking that fantastic. Of course, I mean the figure, itself.

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    1. This is a 1/32 scale figure. He is very fine though isn't he?

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    2. "Fine" is an understatement. Stunning is more apt! The brushwork on the horse is quite singular.

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  2. Excellent - just excellent... I remember attempting this as a mediocre spotty youth...... I took like what he's done with the eyes... so many of them look like they've been on amphetamines for a week.... your comment about warmth is also apt.... my youngest is a horsewoman - on the coldest day in the year there isn't a single person in the (outside) class that is wearing a coat or jacket... she says it is like sitting on a giant radiator...... :o)

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    1. It certainly is. There's no problem working a barrier at a football match with one of these beside you.

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  3. Stunning piece of work! The sheen on the horse is really well done. My congratulations to the artist.

    Regards,
    Lee.

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    1. I shall pass them on. It really is something.

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  4. Arrest him, Kinch! He's far too good to be allowed to roam around painting like that, making the rest of us look rubbish!

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    1. The dastard - I shall have him in irons at once.

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  5. I've had the pleasure of seeing that painting, every day, it is quite exquisitely spectacular...and large! I don't know what happened to it after the amalgamations, but I'd imagine it's either in the regimental HQ/Museum in Gloucester or the National Army Museum at Duke of York's?

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    1. You lucky, lucky sod. I heard it was in Australia at one point?

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  6. I remember making this figure a looong time ago - it did not end up looking like that !!!! - stunning paint job !

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  7. Sacre Ble!
    Are you sure that's an old Airfix mini???
    Amaaaazing piece of painting work!
    I'm stunned...

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    1. I've been gazing at him fondly all day.

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  8. Fantastic work!

    (I did have a Hungarian friend named Lazlo once upon a time)

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  9. He's quite sublime. A font of inspiration for years to come, I am sure. You're a lucky fellow to have him.

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  10. Excellent paintbrush, colors are just great!

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  11. Wow, I can see why you were impressed. Thanks for bring it to us with such lovely photos!

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